Process And Procedure Essay Spm

Essay/Term paper: How to prepare for a job interview

Essay, term paper, research paper:  Expository Essays

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HOW TO PREPARE FOR A JOB INTERVIEW


Interviews, by far, have definitely got to be one the most nerve-wracking events that a person has to go through. Due mostly because most applicants don't prepare enough. Interviews are important and spending ten or more hours preparing is not unreasonable. You want to reach a stage of unconsciously competent. To fully prepare for a job interview, you must role play the interview, know how to effectively answer questions, and list your greatest strengths.
First of all, role playing the interview is very important to ensure that you feel unconsciously competent and confident and it is also easy to accomplish. Use a friend or spouse to act as the interviewer. While embarrassing, it will give you practice in overcoming the initial interview jitters. What happens in the first two minutes is critical; these two minutes represent the first impression so you want it to be strong. Practice a strong handshake, poise, enthusiasm and confidence while talking. People who get jobs easily are natural talkers, ask lots of insightful questions, and give thorough meaningful answers. Role-playing will help you gain these qualities. Keep practicing all of the above until everything feels and sounds natural and spontaneous.
Secondly, know how to effectively answer questions. Short answers less than thirty seconds are useless. Applicants come across as lacking knowledge and insight. Answers over three minutes are too long. Applicants are branded as wordy, too technical or boring. One and half to two minutes is about right. What you say is critical. Forget generalities. You need to provide specific examples to be credible. First, you want to make an opening statement responding to the questions. This should last ten to twenty seconds or so. Second, amplify the statement by providing a little more background describing the opening statement. Another fifteen to twenty seconds. Third, you will need to provide a few examples that prove your opening statement. For example, " Here's an example of how I set up the new system…" This example is really the heart of the response. Without a specific example proving your point, your general statements will not be readily accepted. Interviewers use these examples to confirm their opinions. This part of your response should last about one minute. Finally, wrap it up with a good summary; don't end answers in the middle of a paragraph. Tie up your response with a great close and hand it back to the interviewer. A good ending sets the tone for the rest of the interview. This type of 4-step response not only effectively answers the question; it also brands you as savvy, bright, and capable. It takes into account the needs of the interviewer to be involved and yet leads the discussion toward your strengths.
Lastly, list your greatest strengths. By writing down your examples of accomplishments, you'll recall them more easily in the interview. Include some facts like dates, quantify changes and improvements, and don't generalize key points. You want these examples to be believable and accuracy will help. Since you shouldn't talk for more than two minutes about a strength the amount of information presented is limited by time. This approach will pack a lot of punch in a short response. Make sure you present your strengths in a believable and enthusiastic manner. If you present a number of relevant examples like this your interviewing performance will improve; it takes practice and preparation plus some real accomplishments.
If you follow these three basic guidelines, you're just about guaranteed success. Now that you have confidence, your answers will begin to flow smoothly and your interviewing performance will improve. As well as your typical jitters will be reduced. You can do it, leave the interview with style and impress those employers. Go get em'!


HOW TO PREPARE FOR A JOB INTERVIEW


Interviews, by far, have definitely got to be one the most nerve-wracking events that a person has to go through. Due mostly because most applicants don't prepare enough. Interviews are important and spending ten or more hours preparing is not unreasonable. You want to reach a stage of unconsciously competent. To fully prepare for a job interview, you must role play the interview, know how to effectively answer questions, and list your greatest strengths.
First of all, role playing the interview is very important to ensure that you feel unconsciously competent and confident and it is also easy to accomplish. Use a friend or spouse to act as the interviewer. While embarrassing, it will give you practice in overcoming the initial interview jitters. What happens in the first two minutes is critical; these two minutes represent the first impression so you want it to be strong. Practice a strong handshake, poise, enthusiasm and confidence while talking. People who get jobs easily are natural talkers, ask lots of insightful questions, and give thorough meaningful answers. Role-playing will help you gain these qualities. Keep practicing all of the above until everything feels and sounds natural and spontaneous.
Secondly, know how to effectively answer questions. Short answers less than thirty seconds are useless. Applicants come across as lacking knowledge and insight. Answers over three minutes are too long. Applicants are branded as wordy, too technical or boring. One and half to two minutes is about right. What you say is critical. Forget generalities. You need to provide specific examples to be credible. First, you want to make an opening statement responding to the questions. This should last ten to twenty seconds or so. Second, amplify the statement by providing a little more background describing the opening statement. Another fifteen to twenty seconds. Third, you will need to provide a few examples that prove your opening statement. For example, " Here's an example of how I set up the new system…" This example is really the heart of the response. Without a specific example proving your point, your general statements will not be readily accepted. Interviewers use these examples to confirm their opinions. This part of your response should last about one minute. Finally, wrap it up with a good summary; don't end answers in the middle of a paragraph. Tie up your response with a great close and hand it back to the interviewer. A good ending sets the tone for the rest of the interview. This type of 4-step response not only effectively answers the question; it also brands you as savvy, bright, and capable. It takes into account the needs of the interviewer to be involved and yet leads the discussion toward your strengths.
Lastly, list your greatest strengths. By writing down your examples of accomplishments, you'll recall them more easily in the interview. Include some facts like dates, quantify changes and improvements, and don't generalize key points. You want these examples to be believable and accuracy will help. Since you shouldn't talk for more than two minutes about a strength the amount of information presented is limited by time. This approach will pack a lot of punch in a short response. Make sure you present your strengths in a believable and enthusiastic manner. If you present a number of relevant examples like this your interviewing performance will improve; it takes practice and preparation plus some real accomplishments.
If you follow these three basic guidelines, you're just about guaranteed success. Now that you have confidence, your answers will begin to flow smoothly and your interviewing performance will improve. As well as your typical jitters will be reduced. You can do it, leave the interview with style and impress those employers. Go get em'!







HOW TO PREPARE FOR A JOB INTERVIEW


Interviews, by far, have definitely got to be one the most nerve-wracking events that a person has to go through. Due mostly because most applicants don't prepare enough. Interviews are important and spending ten or more hours preparing is not unreasonable. You want to reach a stage of unconsciously competent. To fully prepare for a job interview, you must role play the interview, know how to effectively answer questions, and list your greatest strengths.
First of all, role playing the interview is very important to ensure that you feel unconsciously competent and confident and it is also easy to accomplish. Use a friend or spouse to act as the interviewer. While embarrassing, it will give you practice in overcoming the initial interview jitters. What happens in the first two minutes is critical; these two minutes represent the first impression so you want it to be strong. Practice a strong handshake, poise, enthusiasm and confidence while talking. People who get jobs easily are natural talkers, ask lots of insightful questions, and give thorough meaningful answers. Role-playing will help you gain these qualities. Keep practicing all of the above until everything feels and sounds natural and spontaneous.
Secondly, know how to effectively answer questions. Short answers less than thirty seconds are useless. Applicants come across as lacking knowledge and insight. Answers over three minutes are too long. Applicants are branded as wordy, too technical or boring. One and half to two minutes is about right. What you say is critical. Forget generalities. You need to provide specific examples to be credible. First, you want to make an opening statement responding to the questions. This should last ten to twenty seconds or so. Second, amplify the statement by providing a little more background describing the opening statement. Another fifteen to twenty seconds. Third, you will need to provide a few examples that prove your opening statement. For example, " Here's an example of how I set up the new system…" This example is really the heart of the response. Without a specific example proving your point, your general statements will not be readily accepted. Interviewers use these examples to confirm their opinions. This part of your response should last about one minute. Finally, wrap it up with a good summary; don't end answers in the middle of a paragraph. Tie up your response with a great close and hand it back to the interviewer. A good ending sets the tone for the rest of the interview. This type of 4-step response not only effectively answers the question; it also brands you as savvy, bright, and capable. It takes into account the needs of the interviewer to be involved and yet leads the discussion toward your strengths.
Lastly, list your greatest strengths. By writing down your examples of accomplishments, you'll recall them more easily in the interview. Include some facts like dates, quantify changes and improvements, and don't generalize key points. You want these examples to be believable and accuracy will help. Since you shouldn't talk for more than two minutes about a strength the amount of information presented is limited by time. This approach will pack a lot of punch in a short response. Make sure you present your strengths in a believable and enthusiastic manner. If you present a number of relevant examples like this your interviewing performance will improve; it takes practice and preparation plus some real accomplishments.
If you follow these three basic guidelines, you're just about guaranteed success. Now that you have confidence, your answers will begin to flow smoothly and your interviewing performance will improve. As well as your typical jitters will be reduced. You can do it, leave the interview with style and impress those employers. Go get em'!







HOW TO PREPARE FOR A JOB INTERVIEW


Interviews, by far, have definitely got to be one the most nerve-wracking events that a person has to go through. Due mostly because most applicants don't prepare enough. Interviews are important and spending ten or more hours preparing is not unreasonable. You want to reach a stage of unconsciously competent. To fully prepare for a job interview, you must role play the interview, know how to effectively answer questions, and list your greatest strengths.
First of all, role playing the interview is very important to ensure that you feel unconsciously competent and confident and it is also easy to accomplish. Use a friend or spouse to act as the interviewer. While embarrassing, it will give you practice in overcoming the initial interview jitters. What happens in the first two minutes is critical; these two minutes represent the first impression so you want it to be strong. Practice a strong handshake, poise, enthusiasm and confidence while talking. People who get jobs easily are natural talkers, ask lots of insightful questions, and give thorough meaningful answers. Role-playing will help you gain these qualities. Keep practicing all of the above until everything feels and sounds natural and spontaneous.
Secondly, know how to effectively answer questions. Short answers less than thirty seconds are useless. Applicants come across as lacking knowledge and insight. Answers over three minutes are too long. Applicants are branded as wordy, too technical or boring. One and half to two minutes is about right. What you say is critical. Forget generalities. You need to provide specific examples to be credible. First, you want to make an opening statement responding to the questions. This should last ten to twenty seconds or so. Second, amplify the statement by providing a little more background describing the opening statement. Another fifteen to twenty seconds. Third, you will need to provide a few examples that prove your opening statement. For example, " Here's an example of how I set up the new system…" This example is really the heart of the response. Without a specific example proving your point, your general statements will not be readily accepted. Interviewers use these examples to confirm their opinions. This part of your response should last about one minute. Finally, wrap it up with a good summary; don't end answers in the middle of a paragraph. Tie up your response with a great close and hand it back to the interviewer. A good ending sets the tone for the rest of the interview. This type of 4-step response not only effectively answers the question; it also brands you as savvy, bright, and capable. It takes into account the needs of the interviewer to be involved and yet leads the discussion toward your strengths.
Lastly, list your greatest strengths. By writing down your examples of accomplishments, you'll recall them more easily in the interview. Include some facts like dates, quantify changes and improvements, and don't generalize key points. You want these examples to be believable and accuracy will help. Since you shouldn't talk for more than two minutes about a strength the amount of information presented is limited by time. This approach will pack a lot of punch in a short response. Make sure you present your strengths in a believable and enthusiastic manner. If you present a number of relevant examples like this your interviewing performance will improve; it takes practice and preparation plus some real accomplishments.
If you follow these three basic guidelines, you're just about guaranteed success. Now that you have confidence, your answers will begin to flow smoothly and your interviewing performance will improve. As well as your typical jitters will be reduced. You can do it, leave the interview with style and impress those employers. Go get em'!







HOW TO PREPARE FOR A JOB INTERVIEW


Interviews, by far, have definitely got to be one the most nerve-wracking events that a person has to go through. Due mostly because most applicants don't prepare enough. Interviews are important and spending ten or more hours preparing is not unreasonable. You want to reach a stage of unconsciously competent. To fully prepare for a job interview, you must role play the interview, know how to effectively answer questions, and list your greatest strengths.
First of all, role playing the interview is very important to ensure that you feel unconsciously competent and confident and it is also easy to accomplish. Use a friend or spouse to act as the interviewer. While embarrassing, it will give you practice in overcoming the initial interview jitters. What happens in the first two minutes is critical; these two minutes represent the first impression so you want it to be strong. Practice a strong handshake, poise, enthusiasm and confidence while talking. People who get jobs easily are natural talkers, ask lots of insightful questions, and give thorough meaningful answers. Role-playing will help you gain these qualities. Keep practicing all of the above until everything feels and sounds natural and spontaneous.
Secondly, know how to effectively answer questions. Short answers less than thirty seconds are useless. Applicants come across as lacking knowledge and insight. Answers over three minutes are too long. Applicants are branded as wordy, too technical or boring. One and half to two minutes is about right. What you say is critical. Forget generalities. You need to provide specific examples to be credible. First, you want to make an opening statement responding to the questions. This should last ten to twenty seconds or so. Second, amplify the statement by providing a little more background describing the opening statement. Another fifteen to twenty seconds. Third, you will need to provide a few examples that prove your opening statement. For example, " Here's an example of how I set up the new system…" This example is really the heart of the response. Without a specific example proving your point, your general statements will not be readily accepted. Interviewers use these examples to confirm their opinions. This part of your response should last about one minute. Finally, wrap it up with a good summary; don't end answers in the middle of a paragraph. Tie up your response with a great close and hand it back to the interviewer. A good ending sets the tone for the rest of the interview. This type of 4-step response not only effectively answers the question; it also brands you as savvy, bright, and capable. It takes into account the needs of the interviewer to be involved and yet leads the discussion toward your strengths.
Lastly, list your greatest strengths. By writing down your examples of accomplishments, you'll recall them more easily in the interview. Include some facts like dates, quantify changes and improvements, and don't generalize key points. You want these examples to be believable and accuracy will help. Since you shouldn't talk for more than two minutes about a strength the amount of information presented is limited by time. This approach will pack a lot of punch in a short response. Make sure you present your strengths in a believable and enthusiastic manner. If you present a number of relevant examples like this your interviewing performance will improve; it takes practice and preparation plus some real accomplishments.
If you follow these three basic guidelines, you're just about guaranteed success. Now that you have confidence, your answers will begin to flow smoothly and your interviewing performance will improve. As well as your typical jitters will be reduced. You can do it, leave the interview with style and impress those employers. Go get em'!

HOW TO PREPARE FOR A JOB INTERVIEW


Interviews, by far, have definitely got to be one the most nerve-wracking events that a person has to go through. Due mostly because most applicants don't prepare enough. Interviews are important and spending ten or more hours preparing is not unreasonable. You want to reach a stage of unconsciously competent. To fully prepare for a job interview, you must role play the interview, know how to effectively answer questions, and list your greatest strengths.
First of all, role playing the interview is very important to ensure that you feel unconsciously competent and confident and it is also easy to accomplish. Use a friend or spouse to act as the interviewer. While embarrassing, it will give you practice in overcoming the initial interview jitters. What happens in the first two minutes is critical; these two minutes represent the first impression so you want it to be strong. Practice a strong handshake, poise, enthusiasm and confidence while talking. People who get jobs easily are natural talkers, ask lots of insightful questions, and give thorough meaningful answers. Role-playing will help you gain these qualities. Keep practicing all of the above until everything feels and sounds natural and spontaneous.
Secondly, know how to effectively answer questions. Short answers less than thirty seconds are useless. Applicants come across as lacking knowledge and insight. Answers over three minutes are too long. Applicants are branded as wordy, too technical or boring. One and half to two minutes is about right. What you say is critical. Forget generalities. You need to provide specific examples to be credible. First, you want to make an opening statement responding to the questions. This should last ten to twenty seconds or so. Second, amplify the statement by providing a little more background describing the opening statement. Another fifteen to twenty seconds. Third, you will need to provide a few examples that prove your opening statement. For example, " Here's an example of how I set up the new system…" This example is really the heart of the response. Without a specific example proving your point, your general statements will not be readily accepted. Interviewers use these examples to confirm their opinions. This part of your response should last about one minute. Finally, wrap it up with a good summary; don't end answers in the middle of a paragraph. Tie up your response with a great close and hand it back to the interviewer. A good ending sets the tone for the rest of the interview. This type of 4-step response not only effectively answers the question; it also brands you as savvy, bright, and capable. It takes into account the needs of the interviewer to be involved and yet leads the discussion toward your strengths.
Lastly, list your greatest strengths. By writing down your examples of accomplishments, you'll recall them more easily in the interview. Include some facts like dates, quantify changes and improvements, and don't generalize key points. You want these examples to be believable and accuracy will help. Since you shouldn't talk for more than two minutes about a strength the amount of information presented is limited by time. This approach will pack a lot of punch in a short response. Make sure you present your strengths in a believable and enthusiastic manner. If you present a number of relevant examples like this your interviewing performance will improve; it takes practice and preparation plus some real accomplishments.
If you follow these three basic guidelines, you're just about guaranteed success. Now that you have confidence, your answers will begin to flow smoothly and your interviewing performance will improve. As well as your typical jitters will be reduced. You can do it, leave the interview with style and impress those employers. Go get em'!



















 

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Tips on Writing a Descriptive Essay

Writers use the descriptive essay to create a vivid picture of a person, place, or thing. Unlike a narrative essay, which reveals meaning through a personal story, the purpose of a descriptive essay is to reveal the meaning of a subject through detailed, sensory observation. The descriptive essay employs the power of language and all the human senses to bring a subject to life for the reader.

If readers come away from a descriptive essay with the feeling that they have really met a person, gone to a particular place, or held a certain object, the writer has done a good job. If readers also feel an emotional connection and deep appreciation for the subject’s significance, the writer has done a great job.

The Five-Step Writing Process for Descriptive Essays
Professional writers know one thing: Writing takes work. Understanding and following the proven steps of the writing process helps all writers, including students. Here are descriptive essay writing tips for each phase of the writing process:

1. Prewriting for the Descriptive Essay
In the prewriting phase of descriptive essay writing, students should take time to think about who or what they want to describe and why. Do they want to write about a person of significance in their lives, or an object or place that holds meaning? The topic doesn’t have to be famous or unusual. The person could be a grandparent, the object, a favorite toy, and the place, a tree house.

Once a topic is chosen, students should spend time thinking about the qualities they want to describe. Brainstorm about all the details associated with the topic. Even when not writing about a place, reflect on the surroundings. Where is the object located? Where does the person live? Consider not just physical characteristics, but also what memories, feelings, and ideas the subject evokes. Memory and emotion play an important role in conveying the subject’s significance. Plan the focus of each paragraph and create an outline that puts these details into a logical sequence.

2. Drafting a Descriptive Essay
When creating the initial draft of a descriptive essay, follow the outline, but remember, the goal is to give the reader a rich experience of the subject. Keep in mind, the most important watchword of writing a descriptive essay is show, don’t tell. One of the best ways to show is to involve all of the senses—not just sight, but also hearing, touch, smell, and taste. Write so the reader will see the sunset, hear the song, smell the flowers, taste the pie, or feel the touch of a hand.

Don’t Tell…Show!

Use descriptive and figurative language, as well as concrete images to describe the subject. Similes and metaphors work well. Here are some examples:

Telling

The house was old.

Showing

The house frowned with a wrinkled brow, and inside it creaked with each step, releasing a scent of neglected laundry.

If you had to pick a study buddy, you would pick this guy.

The clock had been in our family for years.

The clock stood by our family, faithfully marking the minutes and hours of our lives.

Enjoy the process of describing the subject—it can be a rewarding experience. A descriptive essay doesn’t rely on facts and examples, but on the writer’s ability to create a mental picture for the reader.

3. Revising a Descriptive Essay
In the revision phase, students review, modify, and reorganize their work with the goal of making it the best it can be. In revising a descriptive essay, students should reread their work with these considerations in mind:

  • Does the essay unfold in a way that helps the reader fully appreciate the subject? Do any paragraphs confuse more than describe?
  • Does the word choice and figurative language involve the five senses and convey emotion and meaning?
  • Are there enough details to give the reader a complete picture?
  • Has a connection been made between the description and its meaning to the writer? Will the reader be able to identify with the conclusion made?

Always keep the reader in mind from opening to concluding paragraph. A descriptive essay must be precise in its detail, yet not get ahead of itself. It’s better to go from the general to the specific. Otherwise, the reader will have trouble building the image in their mind’s eye. For example, don’t describe a glossy coat of fur before telling the reader the essay is about a dog!

4. Editing a Descriptive Essay
At this point in the writing process, writers proofread and correct errors in grammar and mechanics. It’s also the time to improve style and clarity. Watch out for clichés and loading up on adjectives and adverbs. Having a friend read the essay helps writers see trouble spots and edit with a fresh perspective.

5. Publishing a Descriptive Essay
Sharing a descriptive essay with the rest of the class can be both exciting and a bit scary. Remember, there isn’t a writer on earth who isn’t sensitive about his or her own work. The important thing is to learn from the experience and take whatever feedback is given to make the next essay even better.

Time4Writing Teaches Descriptive Essay Writing
Time4Writing essay writing courses offer a highly effective way to learn how to write the types of essays required for school, standardized tests, and college applications. A unique online writing program for elementary, middle school, and high school students, Time4Writing breaks down the writing process into manageable chunks, easily digested by young writers. Students steadily build writing skills and confidence, guided by one-on-one instruction with a dedicated, certified teacher. Our middle school Welcome to the Essay and Advanced Essay courses teach students the fundamentals of writing well-constructed essays, including the descriptive essay. The high school Exciting Essay Writing course focuses in depth on the essay writing process with preparation for college as the goal. The courses also cover how to interpret essay writing prompts in testing situations. Read what parents are saying about their children’s writing progress in Time4Writing courses.


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